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everywhere in this particular environment. because you have segments of high tech manufacturing. you have segments of innovative financial services. all of those types of businesses in this day and age need skilled productive talent. >> we don't know yet what's going to happen in the state of georgia, whether or not they will follow the lead of arizona and reject the pending legislation. but already we are seeing businesses like delta airlines and others try to distance themselves from what might happen in the state. how important is it for a company like delta to do that? >> well, delta's got a couple of different things at play here. there's lots of choice in airlines, right? and so they're in a very competitive business. they don't want to send the signal that they're aligned with the state , that is particularly unwelcoming or seems to be unwelcoming to certain individuals. and so that would be in the minds i'm sure of the management of delta. >> finally you've been crunching the numbers, doing the retch for a long time -- the research for a long time. more broadly speaking what might
borders supplied a map that shows the increasingly hostile environment for journalist. the areas you see the darker colors, those are the most dangerous areas. and every day we are seeing violence against reporters in russia, egypt, venezuela, mexico. pretty much around the world. is enough being done to help them and what can be done? >> no, i don't think enough is being done. if you take the case of egypt, the arrest of journalists and bloggers is nothing new. the same is true of journalists in saudi arabia, we have seen some in china being arrested left right and center. what can be done, leader in the free world can speak on behalf of these judgists, raise their names in meetings condition aid to improvements in human rights and i think collectively, if we stand up for these political prisoners and journalists we cannot only see their release but the gradual reform of liberal societies. just relently i had my own experience a heated confrontation with iran's foreign minister over the imprisonment of one who has spent four years in prison for criticizing the regime and a outcry. he wa
predicted that in fact, there would have predicted the opposite. background in economics, environment, whet her the magistrates contributing to a lower forecast. it caught everyone off guard to% year over year on new home sales. existing homes is a different category. we had a great year. i appreciate the recognition. we are prepared for the continuation. the existing home sales we only give drivers for the first quarter every subsequent quarter we don't live for the year. but based what we have seen how sales will be down in the range of three through 5%. there is a reason. the price will be up 13 or 15% on existing home sales. either bright or wrong sales volume growth, the price is reacting to a the strong demand. manhattan has literally one month to drive prices. southern california we have weeks. the absence of the inventory is the single greatest concern as to the trend line for the recovery. lou: with the discussion document, i am absolutely buffaloed as to why the republicans would proceed with this document. start out with 10 percent surcharge for high-income earners? your initial
the opposite. background in economics, environment, whet her the magistrates contributing to a lower forecast. it caught everyo off guard to% year over year on new home sales. existing homes is a different category. we had a great year. i appreciate the recognition. we are prepared for the continuation. the existing home sales we only give drivers for the first quarter every subsequent quaer we don't live for the year. but based what we have seen how sales will be down in the range of three through 5%. there is a reason. the price will be up 13 or 15% on existing home sales. either bright or wrong sales volume growth, the pri is reacting to a the strong demand. manhattan has literally one month to drive prices. southern california we have weeks. the absence of the inventory is the single greatest concern as to the trend line for the recovery. lou: with the discuson document, i am absolutely buffaloed as to why the republicans would proceed with this document. start out with 10 rcent surcharge for high-income earners? your initial reaction? >> i applaud the intent. i think the timing is poor.
regulatory environment, it is very difficult for banks to josep juy taking a risk if it defaults and it will take them three years to resolve that situation. in states like california, lender can get sued by a defaulted bar were for making a relatively minor error in the servicing or lending process. a lot of risks. >> the regulatory environment is not helping. what should the regulatory environment be? you have to have some rules. >> some of the rules were put in place that are very good. contact for the bar were. putting in place a really normative standard for making a loan. disclosure. all the things you heard about during the crisis. >> what about for the banks? agree -- we totally don't need to see the new agency that came out of the dodd frank law telling the banks with the price of mortgages ought to be. we should not have legislated the way that prepayment penalties work. as a low credit score bar were its mortgage come your score goes up immediately. another lender will come in and refinance you. that first lender will lose money. they're not going to do that. >> mark f
the that the evidence we brought out in the environment of public works committee was new and hadn't been adequately considered. that was dr. o'connor's work showing the downstream harm from those near the mining of the tar sands and the testimony from a community organizer in texas about those who have health damage because of the refining of tar sands-type crude oil. and then those who are near the pepco, the waste product of it in detroit and chicago with really telling stories about children literally having to flee the baseball field to get away from the cloud of choking dust that was blown off the dump. >> mm-hmm. dr. o'connor, i keep hearing this, that the tar sands oil is far more toxic than anything else that the being refined anywhere in the world. is that correct, sir? >> absolutely. >> it is correct that there's nothing worse coming out of the ground on the face of the earth than this oil that's going to come out of the tar sands. >> all the information we have supports that. >> dr. o'connor, how toxic is it when it comes to imposing possible health risks on society? >> i guess from the
you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
difficult intelligence environment to operate in after all, the russians have been so sort of nervous about western and in particular american presence in ukraine and other states on their borders. they threw out people from nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations that were providing sort of social support and democratic training and leadership training because they believe that they were age ents of the american government. nothing could be further from the truth. but it tells you something about this being a real tense environment. you go to all your technical means of intelligence. satellite, electronics surveillance. you be sure that all the assets of the u.s. government and our allies around the world are being used to understand military what the order of battle is, exactly what assets they're moving closer and into the crimea. but spider marks is quite right. this is an invasion. it is what it is. and to sort of threaten that in june we won't show up to the g 8 isn't really -- tells you we don't have a lot of leverage over the russian. let's remember the president and the white
is an attempt to deal with this country's global foot print to create new strategic environment where the u.s. is supposedly more likely to be dealing in surgical operations and not heavy ground invasions. since the former vice president chose to compare food stamps and the defense budget, let's go ahead and take a look at what's actually happening on that front, too. the recently enacted farm bill cut the food stamp program by $8 billion which means about 850,000 households will lose $90 in monthly benefits. we've reported on that. this year, after 47 million people saw their food stamp benefits reduced because of budget cuts, that's the context, and yet everyone's talking about the military cuts because secretary hagel's proposed pentagon budget makes for an easy headline. like this. "pentagon plans to shrink army to pre world war ii level." okay. here's what some of those cuts actually look like. this is the context behind these headlines. on the left there, see the military's current level. in the middle, the proposed level. on the right, 1940 levels. here are total numbers. so while it
environment is nothing to complain about. >> and what about the personal and commercial banking business, one of the biggest segments of what you guys do. what kind of demand trends are you seeing? >> well, again, there's clearly a slow down on the consumer side, but we're coming off, you know, double digit growth rates, and we're now moving into midsingle digit growth rates. part half is intended. our government has taken an approach to try to slow down consumer debt levels and it's having an impact which i say is a good thing. when you look at loan demand on the commercial side, it remains very strong. as i say, investment demand, deposit demand has been very good. so when you look at the overall platform, it grew at 7% this year -- or this past quarter over quarter, and so it's a slightly slower environment, but as i say not all that bad. >> i mean, we talk about the good quarter you just completed, but you've had a good year at rbc, but don't you feel like the easy money, to use that term, is done now? you guys are going to have to work a little harder to keep that growth rate going, don'
, effectively? >> well, it's hard. it's going to be a significant trading range environment. the market will correct back on a repeating basis. we'll get a period where the market doesn't accomplish a heck of a lot. that's all you should expect. >> you watched janet yellen yesterday. did he provide the confidence that you would have wanted? and the reason i ask is because historically, if you just do the math, every time we get a new chair in this role, we usually have some form of a correction within six months. and the question that i keep wondering is whether we have that correction or it's still to come. >> i think, you know, investors tend to react to the unexpected, not the expected. and yesterday, the messaging was steady as she goes. so i think for now, we're in good shape. the march meeting, unless data falls off the cliff, investors will expect and will treat another $10 billion in tapering to occur. so i think we hand off from bernanke to yellen in this case may be a little different. because she was pretty much on tune with the dovishness of the fed and there hasn't been a f
environment we heard about how a lot of the coverage around elections wasn't particularly polarized. there are undoubtedly concerns around the future of where this is going to be. fragile my work is on states in general. fragile states tend to be fractured state. and we are seeing an increase in the fragmented and fractured media in afghanistan and the most fractured part of that getting quiteably significant injections of funding at the moment. if the last length -- it is the that isng for a state trying to chart its own national identity -- it is not necessarily a useful way of going. but as the media -- but the media is becoming ever more fractured and fragile. >> how solid do you think is the support that you expect to see in terms ofection governmental support for the concept of a free media? i know there was discussion recently about freedom of the press in afghanistan. >> again, when you compare it to other countries, afghanistan has had a remarkable -- has managed to create a remarkable space of freedom of media. this is because -- we should give credit to president karzai .
, talks were dominated by a cooling economy and rising concerns about the environment. tom, manufacturing pmi over the weekend fell slightly. is that a sign of the reaction of weakening growth? is a bit of both. at pmi trajectory came in 50.2, down from 50.5 in january. so it is still slightly above the 50 mark, which is improving from deteriorating conditions. deceleration in the manufacturing sector. the big question is is this to do with february, which this year had the chinese new year holiday, or is it a reflection -- a reflection of genuine problems in the manufacturing sector? pmi?at is the reaction to has rebranded to past 55 from the record low of 53 in january. theome evidence that in domestic economy, and the services sector, it is actually doing slightly better. yuan hasrse, the weakened significantly over concerns. have the npc kicking off this week. what does this mean for the government's broader growth strategy? >> one of the concerns is that a weakening yuan is a reflection of lower investor confidence in china. be deliberate strategy by the people's bank of china. they
position to capitalize and stay upon the improving housing environment in the u.s. >> as you pointed out closing the sales gap, if you had two stocks to buy you'd buy both of them? >> i think by the way i position it, both companies are in the right position to benefit from housi housing. home depot is better positioned. >> gross margin 44.6%, is that a number in line with what you were the examining in. >> that's a good number just like with home depot, a lot of disruption with the weather but in both cases the gross margins held up well despite what could have been a negative makeshift in margin products. >> the at the end of the day you look at the weather situation, this is a company that probably helped out by the weather because they were able to respond quickly? >> probably. the way i think about it, it was probably some weather benefit, a lot of snow removal type products but the real key is going to be as temperatures warm, as the spring finally comes there will be a lot of pent of demand and repair spending at lowe's and home depot and that will be positive for the first quarte
can come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. wh a day. can't wait til tomorrow. neil: you have probably heard that delta will start taking your frequent flyer miles. and i bet you did not hear how some airlines are quietly letting those reedman fares die off or it no more special prices those flying out for their loved one's final arrangement. our friend found out the hard way and the fear he was used to up and vanished. we also have key bloggers here digging into this issue and also some warnings for those flyers who might be in for some interesting surprises. so what happened? >> you know, i had the misfortune of dealing with this person on monday. i lost a family member and i made the call to my favorite airline and the woman said, i'm sorry, we did discontinue debridement program. and that was about a thousand dollars to travel and she said i'm sorry, there's nothing we can do it all. it bothered me. i can afford it fortunately. but there's a lot of people that i
environment if they knew there were tensions between white and latinos and hispanics. that seems to me to be facilitating a hostile environment. if that was their priority to say maybe we shouldn't do this parade instead of maybe kids shouldn't wear an american flag. it seems like a misplacement of priorities. >> i agree. in a weird way they are saying they have to do this to prevent violence. isn't that a form of black mail or while mail or hispanic mail? >> blackmail? that is a weird way to -- >> we are afraid of the violence that is going to occur, so we are telling them you can't do this. it is blackmail. >> most crime in america is blackmail. >> that's terrible. >> as a member of the pta, to a certain point i get the whole needing to avoid the conflict and make sure the kids are safe. unfortunately what is happening is this is becoming gang culture. this is like wearing the color red. that's the american flag. who ever is wearing these t-shirts will beat up these other kids which is unfortunate for our symbol in this country. however, what high school celebrates cinco de mayo. yo
to the environment by the way it is being grown in california. i agree that california might get around this, but it is doing a lot of damage to the environment the way it is being done in california. as it turns out, i did see that piece. the legalizers would say that is why this needs to be legalized. you go out into the wilderness in california, yes, they are using tremendous amounts of pesticides, herbicides and who knows what. the environmental this action is quite phenomenal. this is marijuana growth outside the law. the legalizers would say that is one more reason to bring it under a state jurisdiction, because that way the environmental benefits even to legalizing marijuana. piece. great if people are interested in this as an issue, go on mother jones. host: a tweet from a viewer -- guest: which is what happened last week and san francisco. a mom had her daughter set up in of a medical marijuana dispensary and sold out 157 boxes in record time. excited -- aside, what are the under industries -- other industries popping up because of colorado? guest: that is the joke that' frito sales
started in 2008. the poll found people in environment, north dakota had the lowest flu rates. in the bay area new new flu deaths reported this week. santa clara leads bay area with the most death. a 15th victim was reported earlier this week. >>> new troubles for sears, the retailer is investigating a possible security breach. officials with sears say they are actively reviewing their systems, but so far have found no information indicating a breach. it's not clear what prompted the security investigation. according to bloomberg news the security review is still at an early stage and pinpointing a cyber attack can take weeks of the sears is already coping with years' of declining sale and looking to reenergy sales with a focus on echief meteorologist. >>> it appears that a reaction to spike lee harsh word of gentrification came in the form of a spray can and a rock or two. somebody painted "do the right thing on lee'sliehood home in brooklyn. vandals painted the stairs on lee family home as well. incident happened days after the filmmaker spoke out about wealthy new residents moving into
. we can come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to cf before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade john: ♪ ♪ >> i am special. i'm a baby boomer. there's lots of us. they are the crew born after world war ii. between 1946 and 64. we are called the baby boom because lots of soldiers came home after the war and boom made babies like me. also pj o'rorke. the baby boom and how he got that way and it wasn't my fault and he will never do it again. it wasn't my fault i will never do it again? >> i am 6 # 6 i will never do it again. we
environment. it brings much greater value to our customers. >> there have been very successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems quite good. why not take advantage of that now? >> is more than about the short-term money. about building something great to last year look at our customers. 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is whipping in the win for us is the tremendous it -- return on investment our customers are getting. john will be speaking at our momentum conference. 150 countries and on average, they saved $30 per document and have reduced their turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is when you're at a public company, there is a pressure to focus on the quarter is focusing on the ground game and not the long ball. is that what happens still at public companies? >> i think it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers, and our partners, as public to when you are a company and you focus on quarter after quarter after quarter. we are taking ad
. that is fundamental to our strategy. to thrive in a heterogeneous environment. >> there have been successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems good. why not take advantage? >> it is more than about the short-term money. it is about building something great to last. we look at our customers -- we have 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is really whipping the wind for us is the tremendous return on investment that our customers are getting. john henshaw will be speaking at our momentum conference. he is with hp. on the average, they save $30 per document and have reduce turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is that when you are at a public of any is that there is a pressure to focus on the quarter and that you are focusing on the ground game, not the long ball. is that what happens at public companies? >> it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers and on our partners as opposed to when you are a public company and you are focused on quarter after quarter af
on there. it's a different environment than it was in 2005 or 2006. i would hesitate to say it's over. i think you have to be careful about that. >> whenever i'm in new york, i hear about silicon alley. you hear about, this is the new silicon valley in texas. why is silicon valley continuing to draw the best and brightest? >> is a network effect. if you look at five companies come $5 billion in tech from silicon valley, and you name five in new york, it's hard to find although new york is doing well. it's a network effect. if you're a world-class engineer , where should you go? the overwhelming answer is result,valley, and as a all of the best executives are in silicon valley, or all the ones who know how to scale companies are in silicon valley. there's a predominant amount of money in silicon valley and so forth and the culture itself is very conducive to building companies. all those things combined to make silicon valley a very strong network. it's kind of like hollywood. digital cameras, how hard is it to make a movie? you can make a movie in idaho. but even getting the best key gri
on top of it a light sensor, suddenly you are responding to the environment. what we do is make the kits and we see this consistently, people buy the kits and then come back and buy another kit, then they come back and buy individual bits. >> what's the repeat customer rating? >> right now between 15% and 20%. it's something that we continue to try to grow. obviously a lot of the first two years of the business have been about building the core customer base and the core product line. >> when i think of lego, one of the interesting things about it, they run their manufacturing operations and have amazing quality control. you can take them from this year and they still work with legos 50 years ago. do you worry about because you're open source someone else could take your designs and manufacture them more cheaply? >> we have a very balanced kind of approach to open source where we trademark our name and still hold patents for the connector and the system in general, so ultimately if you want to make something you want to call little bit compatible, it would have to come after being vetted
, radio shack had a tough time in that environment, 4.5%, cutting the management they don't need, and earnings per share beating profit on a ride so sales were still little tricky but stock is doing well. adam: the s and p is on track for record close and the dow is climbing back from earlier losses, 35 points, mixed economic news. turmoil in ukraine, testimony on the hill, an opportunity to address concerns regarding recent soft economic data. >> since my appearance before the house committee on number of data releases point to softer spending. part of that softness may reflect weather conditions. is difficult to discern how much. adam: joining us is oppenheimer funds chief economist, how much of a player is the weather in the south economic data? >> they asked me to come back in april or may and i will tell you. if you didn't buy a house you didn't buy a car because of a blizzard, you might buy it later on. you didn't go out to dinner, that is pretty much spending this law so it is hard to say i was looking at history of past times, got a fight after a particularly bad winters,
in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> and later on the, to the ice cometh. we'll take you where the flooding arrived. take a look at this. the flooding arrives in frozen form. a frozen river moving fast. we'll be right back. hey guys! sorry we're late. did you run into traffic? no, just had to stop by the house to grab a few things. you stopped by the house? uh-huh. yea. alright, whenever you get your stuff, run upstairs, get cleaned up for dinner. you leave the house in good shape? yea. yea, of course. ♪ [ sportscaster talking on tv ] last-second field go-- yea, sure ya did. [ male announcer ] introducing at&t digital life. personalized home security and automation. get professionally monitored security for just $29.99 a month. with limited availability in select markets. ♪ witmarge: you know, there's in a more enjoyable way to get your fiber. try phillips fiber good gummies. they're delicious, and a good source of fiber to help support regularity. wife: mmmm husband: these are good! marge: the tasty side of fiber. from phillips. save you fifteen percent or
a better environment. >> why? so many companies run so poorly? >> i think you have a market that is fair value, plus or minus. it is not overshadowed particularly. corporate are healthy. financials are well capitalized. interest rates are low. company balance sheets are filled with cash. private equities trading over one billion dollars. unclogged capital commitments. ironically in environment where you have low growth means that they are much more receptive to value trading ideas. that lends itself to a very fertile environment for what we do. take one case example. yesterday you filed a 13 tnd with one of your companies, huge, employees 60,000 people. you want to talk to the board about pretty much everything, right? management, capital structure, other stuff. what ultimately are you trying to achieve here you go -- achieve here you go -- achieve here? several pretty much everything. >> is there that much wrong with the company? >> there are a lot of things right with the company. but all of those things you articulated -- i'm very confident we will be able to work things out amicably.
in the environment, who knows what the next eight months will bring. >> fair enough. candidate recruiting is everything. i remember various conversati s conversations. i know on one hand you've had people that you've had conversations with, that have said, you know what, talk to me in '16 when they think it will be more democrats, knowing democratic voters, hillary clinton at the top of the ticket, the shutdown, it got you a few candidates you didn't think you would get because of the environment change in that small period of time. but have you found that you still are struggling getting some people off the fence because they'd rather run in a presidential year? >> no, not at all. in fact, you went through the list. what unifies these top-tier candidates right now is the fact that they are problem solvers. you know, we didn't have to recruit many of them. they recruited themselves because they'd had it with the shutdowns, with republican recklessness and irresponsibility. they are problem solvers in battleground districts. this is our initial rollout. there will be more. we'll have a ve
dispute settlement procedures and rules and enforcement of new obligations upon environment and labor. now, let me turn very quickly to the ttip negotiations. i have a little lesson that i can say on this because they are at an earlier stage of negotiations. though they are also important because the transatlantic economic relationship is our most significant commercial relationship. it's not our most significant trade partnership. the tpp actually is more valuable in that front, but we are talking about over a trillion dollars of two-way trade in goods and services between the united states and the european union, and over $4 trillion in foreign direct investment in each other's market. so it is a huge, huge adventure. the ttip negotiators seek to eliminate tariffs and substantial reduce nontariff barriers in trade and investment. that's a traditional part of the agenda. but as miriam noted, there's also ambitious goals with regard to coordinating or harmonizing regulatory policies affecting trade in goods and services. and that's what the biggest payoff could come very hard to estimate t
is they actually know who you are in a banking environment without having to use a password, just based on .our bio metric interaction they came to us and it was competitive. putting $3 million together and the way it works is we aggregate the investors who go on to our site and see a presentation from the company and watch a rep -- webinar, and they decide and start from $10,000 up. you can try to pick the next whatsapp. it is critical to mention you have got to build a portfolio. this stuff is so risky. you have to diversify. if you do not have 5, 10, or 15 of the companies, you're not doing it right. today ormpany started even in the last few years, do you see their equity strategy as acquisitions or going the ipo route? >> people always prefer ipo because you can build real value and continue building the company. an ipo is another funding event to raise money and better valuation so you continue to build value. most ipos are not showing several others -- selling shareholders. there are a lot of them in israel. 800 are bought for each woman goes public. we have a lot of companies traded in new
at an environment and public works committee hearing on adapting to climate change argued that we'd all be better off if the glaciers just went away. if they just melted away. after all, he told the committee, we evolved at the equator in a climate where freezing weather did not exist. it could be said that frost and ice are the enemies of life. he continued, "obviously if the glaciers stop melting, there will be no more meta-wall street from them -- no more melt water from them, so are you saying that you want the glaciers to stop melting? en this where would the irrigation water come from i say, let the glaciers melt." that's the witness the republicans put up. let the glaciers melt. i guess he missed the difference between seasonal melting, whose annual rhythms fill our streams and rivers for drinking water and fishing and farming and glaciers outright melting away. now, mr. president, there's another little trick the deniers like to play when it's or a little snow falls here in washington or back in their home states, they say, how could there be global warming when it is cold out? and, yes,
protest on an environment in a generation. >> we have thousands of young people here in the streets of washington, marching to the white house, to risk arrest, to demand obama said no to keystone xl. >> the most important issue that we're facing and it's going to affect millions of people all over the world. >> this is a march to show that young people care, care about our future, we're willing to come together and act, and now he needs to act. we are here together to show forth and president obama needs to make a pipeline. >> we need to show obama a lot of people who got him elected, youth vote, student vote, want him to take a stronger stance on climb and reject the pipe. >> we get arrested. first thing that this is not going to do anything. but as you go forth and you see people come to you and tell you you're a precedent you set, it has a huge impact. the most important thing pitting your body again the gears of the machine and say this madness must stop. >> what is profound about the sound bite we played the young lady said this is going to affect millions and millions of peopl
environment. that got off the ground. we are seeing wealthy investors turning it into something that can be more useful to invest in, as a way to create faster, more efficient transactions. >> i have to be honest with you. who would invest in bitcoin. why would they invest in bitcoin. i understand that price is low, currently. and the other problem was the price fluk twuted dramatically, right. >> four sure, and i would not recommend anyone invest in boit coin until there are regulations and until those are in place, and even then, there'll be a lot more mainstream more investment to come down the line before i recommend anyone get into this. >> how long do you think it will be before bitcoin gets back on track? >> i think it will be a couple of months. once we see regulations come online, superintendent lowsk. >> led the way, issuing licences. we'll see that, it will be a while before mainstream users will want to take a look. >> rob while, great to have you on the program. thanks for sharing your insight. >> from bitcoin to a different commodity. gold coins. a california couple walkin
them feel that's their environment, "we help you, we believe in it." the project is paper and glue. the way people involve themselves in it is so much more. it's like community. it's people opening the windows, moving the roof. it gets deeper than that. you look at it. it's about the whole experience. more than the photo. the photo is amazing when you look at the hill covered. when you lead the process, it's life-changing. that is what took be to it. the people need to see the process, and for that they have to go through it. they really have to take the risk to get to know the people around them. life is not only on twitter and instagram. it's if you knock on the neighbour and ask something crazy, you might say yes. if you don't try, you think he's a loser and never know. >> do you know, what did the women take from that project? >> first you see it when you walk in the streets, the women have the dignity. eyes and look. they've been through the conflict and hold the family together. you have to be hungry. they carry so much intensity and strength and i did all the interview with
are not usually arrested and jailed? >> no, we have seen it in very restrictive environments so the central asian stands in china for example, there's been a crack down in foreign reporters. so this is really a worrying signal they are also going to go after foreign reporters. and it is one of the ways of giving out news -. >> egypt is a country that has been very close to the united states in the recent past. no amount of jake carney today at the white house brief and talking about these reporters will make egypt it seems simply say okay, go and sin no more. >> i think egypt is a critically important country. your four are among four that have been -- it's really almost impossible to be the critical of the government now. egypt is the most important country. it is critical to pay more attention, egypt hasn't gotten the attention it deserves. i think in the last seven or eight months and it is at a critical juncture right now. for more open debate about a range of issues. >> from freedom house, and from amnesty international, thank you very much for being with us today. >> thank you so much. >> b
, international correspondents are not usually jailed. >> no, we've seen them in different environments around the world. in china there has been a crackdown on foreign reporters, and even in russia in this past year. but open countries it's less common. this is a worrying signal by egypt. they are going to go after foreign reporters. in this case it's one of the main areas to get out news and information. it's a particular concern to us. >> michael posener, what do you make of it? egypt has been a major recipient of american aid but no amount of jay carney today at the white house briefing talking about these reporters is going to make egypt simply say, okay, fellas, go and sin no more. >> yeah, i think egypt is a critically important country at a have dangerous moment right now. it's not just your four journalists among dozens that have been arrested and are being held. civil society, human rights activists, it's almost impossible to be critical of the government now even on things how they drafted the constitution without coming under the government's wrath. egypt is the most important coun
that is part of our environment, utilizing that in a way that generates an electricity and does it in a benign way, is a very strong cornerstone advanced by the president in this effort. also the $4. 2 billion he brings forth to provide for innovation and create new outcomes for energy purposes, not only with efficiency and generation but the transmission of that energy supply and looking at efforts to expand and make permanent the production tax credits that are so important for renewable energy in this country. so those are two good, very valuable investments. let me then just highlight a few others that i believe will be a progress i outcome if we are to accept this notion here in congress. one would be to address the clean energy research program and the president does that with a major down payment for clean energy research, he also addresses the advanced research project agency in the energy capacity, acronymed out at arpa-e. it commits a very laser sharp focus on research as it relates to innovation in the energy sector. will all those outcomes be successful? perhaps not. in fact, the c
of markets with a bad the environment for business? >> he is in answering in mandarin chinese. i could tell you what he is saying but you have to wait. you cannot afford to miss it. [ male announcer ] hands were made for playing. legs, for crossing. feet...splashing. better things than the joint pain and swelling of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. if you're trying to ma, now may be time to ask about xeljanz. xeljz (tofacitinib) is a small pill, not an injection or infusion, for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. seris, sometimes fatal infections and cancers have happened in patients taking xeljanz. don't start xeljanz if you have any infection, unless ok with your doctor. tears in the stomach or intestines, low bod cell counts and higher liver tes and cholesterol levels have happened. your doctor should perform blood tts before you start and while taking xeljanz, and roinely check certain liver tests. tell your doctor if you have been to a region where certain fungal
in that environment was not correcting the problem. it was enhancing the problem. >> reporter: they hemmed to write georgia's juvenile laws. they say they're better off being rehabilitated in their home where rather than being influenced by older hardened offenders. >> what we found out a lot of these children coming into the system were not really bad children. they were doing dumb things. so we wanted to find a better way of treating them under the local level. >> reporter: georgia is following states like texas and louisiana by diverting juveniles to community-based programs. >> runaway or possession of alcohol, rather than having those children detained, is there there are interventions that will happen between the youth and specific state agencies to get to the underlying cause. >> reporter: a new commission is in charge of making sure that the programs are consistent and effective scenario across the s. the state also believes they will save a lot of money in this change. the community based programs the governor said will cut the costs to $3,000 a year. the laws will prevents judges from acc
things out of your environment. that is how you solve problems. john: in terms of people test -- testing, is this better? this is what people did. >> they are reading about the world. so. >> i am wearing orange socks. aren't they cool? john: not all. >> not talking about the story next key. a few. talking about what they had for dinner and what the best tacos are. john: any chance that you are a grouchy old man. >> i was a grungy old man -- was a grouchy teenager, and reggie young adults, and alabama grouchy -- i would not say hamel your old. i'm not old. i like what they create. facebook is a wonderful thing. if you can control it. john: you're going beyond that. cyberspace addiction, an epidemic is leading to a weaker america. >> true. no doubt in my mind. john: socrates, old people have always complained about young people of people -- >> old people are smarter than young people. socrates said that and right after that he drank hemlock and died. so depressed that he killed himself. john: in this case the young people may be smarter than me, and we will find out. >> smarter than you, b
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
to run my state the bay i want to. let me make the environment such that i can promote jobs in my own state. i don't need the federal government doing this for me. >> but i think you need to look at the entire tax code. do you realize -- >> but you shouldn't be paying 15% when people making less than you are paying a higher rate. >> but if i -- >> that nibt be the case for you. you pit it in harm's way, you're investing it? >> that's another way to say it. >> depending on what you're doing could be putting it in harm's way to lose it. >> put in bitcoins. >> but when you're putting other people's money in harm's way, this goes back to what we talked about before, as the private equity manager, why is that -- why is that the not a commission oriented business? >> when you see somebody make $500 million of which a large portion of it is in carried pictures. that's what private equity is. i redeploy it all the time. i'm constantly buying new deals. why would you want me to stop doing that? >> it's not a matter of punishing you. it's a matter of giving you special status. and i'm not argui
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
and greenpeace cofounder patrick moore. he made these comments before the senate environment and public works committee. he left greenpeace because he says that group became more interested in politics than the environment. what an announcement from him. >>> men who wait too long to become fathers could put their children at greater risk of developing mental health problems. that's according to a new study that followed more than 2.5 million men for 25 years. researchers found a child born to a 45-year-old father compared to a 24-year-old dad was three times more likely to have autism, 13 times more likely to have adhd, 25 times more likely to be bipolar and twice as likely to have schizophrenia. this is video you have to see to believe. two guys in those wing suits flying past christ the redeemer statue in britain. look at this. the two daredevils making that jump from about 6,500 feet. they landed safely. and what was the first thing they did? what do you think? what do you think? >> they prayed. >> drank a beer. look at that. >> they earned it. >> how close they get. nerve wracking. see yo
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